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The ramblings of Minecraft addict VladTubaka

Tag Archives: mods

I wanted a special room to complement the awesome look of the Ender IO Telepad. I used Steel Scaffolding from Immersive Engineering for the flooring. Under that is a layer of Celestial Crystal (added to the End by Biomes O'Plenty). The walls and ceiling are made up Conduit Facade painted to look like various decoration blocks from Ender IO, as well as more Celestial Crystal.

I wanted a special room to complement the awesome look of the Ender IO Telepad. I used Steel Scaffolding from Immersive Engineering for the flooring. Under that is a layer of Celestial Crystal (added to the End by Biomes O’Plenty). The walls and ceiling are made up Conduit Facade painted to look like various decoration blocks from Ender IO, as well as more Celestial Crystal.

Even though the extended version of the End (that includes Outer Islands and End Cities and Ships and stuff) has been in the game for a little while, now, up until recently I had never visited it. I wasn’t playing a lot of Minecraft when it was introduced, and in my current game I have been more interested in exploring the various mods I have installed.

But my curiosity finally got the better of me, and I decided to go exploring. I’ll probably be spending a good deal of time in the End for the foreseeable future, so I decided that I wanted a fast way to get not only to the End but to the Outer Islands without traveling 1500 blocks in the Overworld (or about 200 blocks in the Nether) to get to the End Portal, then using an ender pearl or two every time to make it through the End Gateway. Continue reading

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I recently added Immersive Engineering to the list of mods I’m playing with in my current game. I’ve played a little with it before, and gaaawwww-lee is it a cool mod! As a tech mod, it has some basic functions in common with other big tech mods like Industrial Craft, Thermal Expansion, Rotarycraft, Mekanism, and Ender IO. But in its GUI-less multiblock approach and its overall aesthetic, it is completely unlike any other tech mod out there. Continue reading


***Inasmuch as I am moving my family and me to a different State next week, and inasmuch as I am finishing up revisions for a book of mine that is being published, in light of my resulting lack of Minecraft playing time this week, I hereby offer up to the Minecraft-blog-reading community this post, originally begun several months ago, rather than a further spotlight of the v25 update to Rotarycraft, GeoStrata, and Electricraft. Therefore, be aware that some of this information may be slightly out of date. Nevertheless, enjoy!***

Underground Biomes by Grom PE (originally by Exterminator Jeff) is an outstanding mod based on a very simple idea that adds tremendous aesthetic versatility to the rather bland gray stone of vanilla Minecraft. I’ve actually switched over to Underground Biomes Constructs by Zeno410 because of its addition of slabs, stairs, and walls for all of the stone types. These two versions, I expect, will find their way into a single mod before too long, but either way UB is now one of those mods that I cannot imagine playing without (or, as one sees stated so often on the forums, this really ought to be in vanilla Minecraft).

One of the side effects, though, of playing with UB , is the complication of your stone storage. You can’t simply have one double chest worth of cobblestone anymore. There are 16 new kinds of cobblestone (vanilla stone still shows up where lava and water mingle, so you have a total of 17 kinds of cobblestone), and 8 kinds of sedimentary rock (which doesn’t turn into cobblestone when you mine it). While you’re likely to only encounter 1-3 kinds of rock in a small area around your initial base, it doesn’t take too much exploration to gather generous amounts of all (or at least most) kinds of UB stone. Not that this is really that big of a complication. It just takes space.

Yup. A whole building dedicated to sorting and storing rocks. I'm such an interesting person.

Yup. A whole building dedicated to sorting and storing rocks. I’m such an interesting person.

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The much-anticipated update for Reika’s mods to v25 has now been released. There are a lot of important tweaks, changes, improvements, and nerfs (especially for Rotarycraft – wow, that’s a long list). I need to take some time to go through the change log and see how it’s going to affect my current game, but for today, let’s take a look at some of the cool things added to GeoStrata.

GeoStrata v25 has new stone block designs and default multipart support!

GeoStrata v25 has new stone block designs and default multipart support!

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***Beware: this post is a doozy*** With v25 of Reika’s mods being released any day, now, solar power is about to be rendered impossible as an early-game strategy. Nevertheless, the setup I started describing in my last post not only works (assuming you have access to the materials necessary to craft it), but also serves as a useful way to introduce many of the blocks made available by Electricraft. As I mentioned before, the problem with solar power is that it doesn’t work at night. But with Electricraft, what we can do is stabilize the energy system by storing the mechanical energy the solar tower generates during the daytime in the form of a battery, which can provide that energy on demand, day or night.

Today ... Electricraft!

Today … Electricraft!

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With all the cobblestone, ore, and other goodies coming into your inventory through your boring machine, fueling your furnace operations is going to become a high priority. Fortunately, Rotarycraft has two ways to use energy for smelting purposes. A slightly later-mid-game option is the lava smeltery which cooks 18 items at a time (and quickly), but which requires both rotational power and a constant supply of lava. More practically at a relatively early stage in the game, you can use one of two heaters to heat a vanilla furnace. The one called simply the heater requires rotational power and fuel, while the friction heater requires nothing but rotational power. It is this last option that I’m going to use for this build. Furthermore, I’m going to take advantage of an option for passive power generation in Rotarycraft to power this friction heater: solar towers. This project is big, and will take two lengthy posts to describe. Continue reading


So you’re playing Rotarycraft, you’ve got the blast furnace, the worktable, a fermenter or two, and grinder. What do you do next? Farming? Heck, no. You go directly for the machine that will help you tear apart the earth’s core in search of filthy lucre and non-sustainable natural resources: the boring machine.

Here is my boring machine powered by two AC electric engines through a worm gear. What does all of mean? Read on ...

Here is my boring machine powered by two AC electric engines through a worm gear. What does all of this mean? Read on …

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