The much-anticipated update for Reika’s mods to v25 has now been released. There are a lot of important tweaks, changes, improvements, and nerfs (especially for Rotarycraft – wow, that’s a long list). I need to take some time to go through the change log and see how it’s going to affect my current game, but for today, let’s take a look at some of the cool things added to GeoStrata.

GeoStrata v25 has new stone block designs and default multipart support!

GeoStrata v25 has new stone block designs and default multipart support!

Microblock Support

Forge Multipart is now supported by default. Before, in order to use Multipart with GeoStrata blocks, you would have had to list the block id numbers in the Forge Multipart config file. So now you can make covers, panels, and slabs without bothering with the config files. Using Forge Multipart with GeoStrata is important, because slab and stair blocks are not built into the mod. Using Forge Multipart you can manually make these blocks, however (Carpenter Blocks might enable you to do this, too, but I haven’t tried it).

More Stone Patterns

Each kind of GeoStrata stone now has six more textures for a total of 15 textures (counting smooth, cobblestone, and stone brick). These new texture types are: lined, embossed, centered, raised, etched, and cubed. Rather than just show a screenshot with these blocks in isolation, I think presenting them in situ might more effectively give you an idea of how cool this update is. Rather than building something from scratch, what I have done is taken a portion of a Testificate desert village and replaced blocks of vanilla sandstone with four different kinds of stone in 13 of the 15 textures (excluding cobblestone and smooth stone).

The NPC village before my renovations.

The NPC village before my renovations …

... and after.

… and after.

For the well, I used limestone: 'engraved' for the top border around 'connected', 'fitted' for the lower border with 'round' (or fancy brick) at the corners, and at the bottom are stairs made from microparts or 'lined' limestone. Notice the 'connected' limestone pillars in place of the fence posts.

For the well, I used limestone: ‘engraved’ for the top border around ‘connected’, ‘fitted’ for the lower border with ’round’ (or fancy brick) at the corners, and at the bottom are stairs made from microparts of ‘lined’ limestone. Notice the ‘connected’ limestone pillars in place of the fence posts.

I replaced the sandstone of the farm area with connected limestone around the edge and tiled limestone through the center.

I replaced the sandstone of the farm area with ‘connected’ limestone around the edge and ’tiled’ limestone through the center.

As a walkway in front of the church-like building, I used GeoStrata sandstone: 'cubed', 'centered', and 'brick.'

As a walkway in front of the church-like building, I used GeoStrata sandstone: ‘cubed’, ‘centered’, and ‘brick.’

The outside of the building is marble and pumice, with a little nether quartz brick at the top. I used pumice 'brick' and marble 'etched', 'embossed', 'inscribed', and 'fitted' textures. The steps in the front are micropart marble 'brick'.

The outside of the building is marble and pumice, with a little nether quartz brick at the top. I used pumice ‘brick’ and marble ‘etched’ (the banners), ’embossed’ (the corner columns), ‘inscribed’ (at the top), and ‘fitted’ (at the bottom) textures. The steps in the front are micropart marble ‘brick’. The back roof pictured here is ‘connected’ marble with a border of micropart marble ‘brick’.

Inside the front door. The ceiling is 'cubed' marble, the floor is 'tiled' marble, the steps are micropart marble 'brick.'

Inside the front door. The ceiling is ‘cubed’ marble, the floor is ’tiled’ marble, the steps are micropart marble ‘brick.’ Once again, the walls are pumice ‘brick’ and ’embossed’ marble.

Here on top you can see 'inscribed' marble, 'raised' marble (on the floor), and nether quartz brick.

Here on top you can see ‘inscribed’ marble, ‘raised’ marble (on the floor), and nether quartz brick.

These pictures only showcase four of the 16 kinds of stone added by GeoStrata, but you can see how all the textures can be used to create increased visual interest and appeal for otherwise bland buildings.

Crystal Plants Drop Shards

This is a big deal, in my opinion. I haven’t talked about the crystal shards of GeoStrata, but they are a really cool feature of the mod. Not infrequently in caves and in the Nether, you will encounter crystals of different colors. These crystals, when you are near them, give you various kinds of potion effects. You can break them into shards then use them potions, rebuild them as lamps, potion lamps, or pendants, or else you can turn them into seeds and grow crystal plants. Up until this update, crystal plants were only decorative. Now, when fully grown they have a chance of dropping more shards of the crystals that you used to make their seeds originally. Note that when Reika updates to 1.7, the plan is to move the crystals from GeoStrata, his DyeTrees mod, and his Ender Forest mod into a single magic-based mod named Chromaticraft. I like the idea and would have voted for it had I been paying attention to the poll on the FTB forums a few months ago. Color-based magic (which is what this sounds like) is a great idea, and one that played a big part in a fantasy novel I read and enjoyed this last year by Brandon Sanderson, Warbreaker.

There are a couple of other changes, but these are the three that strike me as most important (at least they are the most important for me at my current stage in my game).

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