Life happens from time to time. It happened recently, and my Minecraft time suffered the consequences. A big part of what has stimulated the resurgence of my interest in Minecraft has been a suite of mods by Reika, including especially Rotarycraft and Reactorcraft. I have put my TerraFirmaCraft game on hold for the moment in favor of a survival game using only Reika’s mods, my intention being to fully explore the potential of each of these mods without being distracted by other mods like Thaumcraft or Thermal Expansion or being tempted by them to cheaply overcome a difficult step in Reika’s tech tree. Today’s post, however, is NOT about Rotarycraft or Reactorcraft, but about one of Reika’s other mods which I have installed: Geostrata.

A new bridge showcasing Geostrata blocks.

A new bridge showcasing Geostrata blocks.

Geostrata is a mod like Underground Biomes (or TerraFirmaCraft, for that matter) that adds a lot of varieties of stone from the real world, like Granite, Limestone, Schist, and Gneiss. Whereas Underground Biomes replaces all vanilla stone with its varieties, Geostrata only adds veins, leaving the majority of vanilla stone unchanged. Geostrata also adds a larger variety of designs or each of its kinds of stone (kind of like Railcraft in this respect). For example, each kind of stone has-in addition to its smooth stone, cobblestone, and brick textures-a “round” texture (like vanilla chiseled), a fitted brick, an inscribed stone, a connected stone, an engraved stone, and a tile. The bridge pictured above uses three types of stone (Basalt, Pumice, and Slate) and three of the above-mentioned textures to make a bridge with a good deal of visual interest (brick, fitted brick, and inscribed stone).

A closer shot of all six kinds of stone texture used on the bridge.

A closer shot of all six kinds of stone texture used on the bridge.

In the above picture, the darkest stone is Basalt, and you can see both brick and inscribed Basalt textures. The light colored stone above the Basalt is Pumice, of which I have used the brick, fitted brick and inscribed textures. Just below the center of the image, below the oak logs, you can see a slightly lighter gray fitted brick made from Slate.

The other side of the bridge looking back the other direction.

The other side of the bridge looking back the other direction.

I have only used oak wood, which is usually pretty boring by itself, to highlight just how interesting structures can be using Geostrata rock. I am quite pleased with the colors and textures built into Geostrata. The Peridotite rock is amazing (a rich marbled green color). I need to find more of it so I can build a structure that highlights it.

Looking through the bridge.

Looking through the bridge.

The dark strips lying across the bridge floor is fitted Slate brick.

Night falling on my new bridge.

Night falling on my new bridge.

My intention is to write a few posts in the next couple of weeks highlighting Reika’s Rotarycraft. We’ll see what life thinks of that plan.

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